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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 40

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct. Phrasal Verbs with 'drag' and 'drop'.



1. I think John´s going to drop _____ later for a beer or two.
on
up
by
off





2. Demand for the product has dropped _____ a bit in the last few months, but that's entirely attributable to seasonal factors.
out
down
on
off





3. I dropped _____ in front of the TV again last night. I'm either getting old or working too hard.
down
out
on
off





4. I can easily drop you _____ at the staion as it's on my way home.
away
on
by
off





5. John dropped _____ his Physics course as it was simply beyond him.
off from
down from
out from
out of





6. I don't know why you insist on constantly dragging _____ the past. It's not as if it can be changed.
off
out
up
on





7. The meeting dragged _____ until 7.30. I thought we were never going to get out of there.
on
off
away
over





8. I can't see any point in dragging this _____ any longer as we're obviously not going to reach an agreement today.
down
out
off
away


9. Please don't try and drag me _____ your marital problems. I don´t want to have to take sides.
through
onto
into
out





10. If I can drag the kids _____ from the TV, we´ll come round for dinner.
on
away
off
down