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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 52

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct. Phrasal Verbs with 'take' 1.

1. With her black hair and olive skin she's often taken _________ an Italian, but she's actually Swedish.
out
by
for
on





2. He´s planning to take the family _____ somewhere warm for Christmas.
out
on
away
over





3. His report took _____ all the main issues. It was very broad in its scope.
out
in
on
up





4. These trousers are much too long in the leg. They'll have to be taken _____ before I can wear them.
over
out
up
away





5. I was somewhat taken _____ by the news that the company was being sold. To be honest, it came as a complete surprise.
about
aside
along
aback





6. You really should take _____ their offer. It's a once in a lifetime opportunity.
up
over
off
in





7. He´s very much like his father in so may ways. He really takes _____ him.
up
after
off
like





8. John took me _____ at work yesterday to tell me that he was going to resign. It came as quite a shock.
out
off
aside
away





9. I took the engine _____ and then had no idea how to put it back together again.
down
out
apart
away





10. For some reason Pete has rather taken _____ the idea. He was quite enthusiastic about it at first, but something seems to have made him reverse his initial opinion.
against
out
away
over