New Block

www.phrasalverbexercises.com

Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 3

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. Do you feel _____ going out for a beer or two this evening?
on
in
to
like





2. John can just about get _____ in French if he has to. He can normally make himself understood.
over
through
by
down





3. I´d like to fix _____ a meeting for some time early next week.
down
on
up
in





4. He has finally managed to give _____ smoking after years of trying.
up
on
in with
to





5. I've already had five guesses. I give _____ . Just tell me the answer!
off
up
out
away





6. If we don´t check _____ by 11.30, we´ll have to pay for another night.
down
away
off
out





7. I´m going to try and cheer John _____ with a surprise party.
on
over
out
up





8. It took a while to calm him _____ as he was really upset.
up
out
off
down





9. They do _____ houses and then sell them on at a profit.
on
off
down
up





10. I´m sorry I had to cancel our dinner date, but I promise I´ll make it _____ to you.
over
on
out
up