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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 8

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. I've really got to revise for my accountancy exams. I'll have to spend all night mugging _____ .
out
on
off
up





2. John made _____ a frankly ridiculous excuse for not having finished the report.
up
away
on
off





3. I came _____ this old photo of my grandparents when I looking for something in the attic.
away
out
with
across





4. I bumped _____ John in the town this afternoon. I hadn't seen him since university.
across
with
into
for





5. I still haven´t completely ruled _____ the possibility of taking the job. I'm keeping my options open.
down
out
away
off





6. Jane has come _____ _____ a great new way to cut production costs.
out with
off with
away with
up with





7. John lost control of his car at speed and crashed _____ a wall. Fortunately, he wasn't very badly injured.
in
into
with
off





8. If the photocopier has been fixed, could you run _____ twenty copies of this report, please?
in
out
off
away





9. I´m going to have to dip _____ my savings to pay for the repairs. I was hoping to use the money for something more interesting.
on
out
from
into





10. I´m having my house done _____ at the moment, so I´m staying with friends while the building and decorating is being done
on
up
in
by