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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 15

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. As soon as I got to the airport, I went _______ _______ the information desk to ask how long my flight would be delayed.
up to
off to
away to
on to





2. One thing I will say for John is that he never goes back _______ his word. If he promises to do something, he does it.
on
in
off
from





3. As time goes _______ he seems to get even more antisocial.
away
off
down
by





4. Fifteen years of his life have gone _______ the building up of this company.
over
onto
into
under





5. A bomb went _______ in the town centre last week. Nobody has claimed responsibility.
up
off
on
out





6. There´s a particularly virulent strain of flu going _______ at the moment.
around
over
up
on





7. John's going _______ saying that he was the one who called off the engagement, which is quite untrue.
away
around
over
on





8. We've invited so many people to the barbecue. I hope there´s enough food to go _______ . I don't want anyone to go hungry.
over
down
round
by





9. There's a rumour going _______ the company that the CEO is going to resign.
around
out
over
under





10. This model goes _______ about $50,000. Cash buyers can normally expect some sort of a discount, however.
off
to
over
for