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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 13

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. The police are hoping that somebody will come _____ with information that could lead to an arrest.
in
on
forward
over





2. Unfortunately, his performance didn't come _____ _____ our expectations and we had to let him go.
up to
over with
down to
on with





3. There´s no doubt that Pete came _____ just at the right moment.
away
out
up
along





4. We're going out for a few beers this evening. You're more than welcome to come _____ if you want to.
in
with
along
on





5. To be honest, it was a bit of a risky option, but fortunately it came _____ .
up
off
on
to





6. It really all comes _____ to cost levels; ours are simply too high and we won´t be competitive again until such time as we do something about it.
over
off
up
down





7. He's taken a lot of convincing, but I think he´s finally coming _____ to our point of view.
in
round
off
on





8. Those seeds I planted last week are already coming _____ . Lots of little green shoots have appeared.
out
off
up
on





9. My roses should be coming _____ any time soon. That should brighten the garden up a bit.
on
over
off
out





10. She finally came _____ and told her family and friends that she was gay.
on
up
off
out