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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 11

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. Nobody really knows how this terrible situation came _____ .
to
off
over
about





2. She finally came _____ to the idea, but she took a lot of convincing.
round
in
on
over





3. This jacket is coming _____ at the seams. Why don´t you just throw it out?
away
out
off
apart





4. We´ve come _____ _____ quite a number of problems since we started the project.
over to
down against
up against
over against





5. I came _____ an old photo when I was clearing out the garage.
along
up
over
across





6. The government´s economic policies have come _____ _____ some criticism lately.
in for
up against
up to
on for





7. They came _____ _____ an ingenious solution to the problem. I would never have thought of it myself.
up to
up with
down with
on with





8. He finally came _____ after being unconscious for a fair old time.
over
to
through
about





9. The bill came _____ an incredible $350. Thank God I had a credit card on me.
on
out
to
up





10. 10. Her new book is coming _____ next month. They've already sold the film rights.
off
out
over
up