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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 21

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. I think we're going to have to _____ over what's been agreed so far just to make sure we´re all on the same page.
go
put
take
make





2. John will be _____ over as HR manager upon Bill´s retirement. I must say I think he'll do a great job.
taking
setting
getting
making





3. Paula is still _____ over the death of her sister.
working
setting
putting
getting





4. She's planning to _____ the bulk of the estate over to her son Patrick when he's 30.
work
get
make
leave





5. There was a lot of food _____ over after the party, so we all took something home rather than let it all go to waste.
stood
left
set
laid





6. The cinema is _____ the film over for another week as it has proven so popular.
holding
staying
having
putting





7. I'm _____ some friends over for drinks and a bite to eat this evening. You´re more than welcome to join us.
bringing
having
taking
putting





8. I've _____ Pete and Jane over for a drink this evening.
got
brought
asked
taken





9. Would you mind ______ this over for me? I´d be interested to know your opinion.
looking
seeing
watching
examining





10. Would you mind if I _____ over? There's a film I´d like to watch on HBO.
moved
changed
went
turned