New Block

www.phrasalverbexercises.com

Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 59

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. Some of the engineers have broken _____ to form a company of their own. It's not going to be easy to replace them quickly.
away
through
down
out





2. When I shut _____ my computer, it hangs for a while.
under
by
down
away





3. I think it's time we got _____ work. We've wasted enough time chatting about nothing in particular.
by to
up to
down to
under to





4. I asked him if he'd like a piece of my chocolate bar and he broke _____ an enormous chunk. He must have taken at least half of it.
out
over
off
up





5. He revised for his exams for a long time and it paid _____ when he got the highest grade possible.
at
by
over
off





6. He's been boning _____ his exams all week. I hope he gets a good result as he certainly has studied hard.
up to
up for
up from
up by





7. I forgot about the saucepan of milk on the stove and so it boiled _____ , and now I've got to clean the hob.
out
down
over
off





8. If you would just bear _____ me for a moment, I'll be with you in a second.
to
for
with
about





9. A fire broke _____ at work last week. Fortunately, it was contained and soon dealt with.
off
in
up
out





10. We really need to branch _____ into other areas. We clearly can't rely on our core business for our long-term future.
out
under
over
up