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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 62

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. We haven't ruled it _____ completely, but it would be our very last option.
out
off
down
away





2. Could you please hurry _____ , or we'll be late!
under
on
up
off





3. I wonder if you could clear something _____ for me. Who is going to be in charge of the new department?
off
away
up
out





4. If that offer to borrow your holiday home is still open, I'd like to take you _____ it.
up on
up with
up by
up to





5. After talking it _____ with my wife and children, I've decided not to accept the job in Los Angeles.
away
on
under
over





6. We're all going to chip _____ and buy him a decent present this year.
up
in
off
by





7. We're going to have to cut _____ our advertising expenditure as we're spending a fortune and not getting much for our money.
back from
back down
back on
back off





8. It's beginning to cloud _____ . I hope that doesn't mean rain later as I've got a game of golf scheduled.
back
forward
over
about





9. I went round to see Pete to try and cheer him up as I knew he was a bit cut _____ about not getting the job.
out
down
off
up





10. When the sun comes out it always cheers me _____ . It's hard to be very depressed when the weather's good.
out
up
over
on