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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 67

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. The plane had to touch _____ in a field as it had a mechanical problem and would never have made it to the nearest airport.
down
over
by
out





2. She touched _____ a great variety of topics in her presentation, but I felt she would have done better to have covered fewer topics but in greater detail.
on
down
out
up





3. He's still trying to track _____ all the spare parts he needs for his vintage car.
off
for
down
out





4. You should always warm up before starting to work _____ at the gym.
out
off
over
up





5. This car is too expensive to run. You really should trade it _____ for something that gives you more miles to the gallon and doesn't cost a fortune to insure.
in
away
off
over





6. Rumour has it that John tried it _____ with Jane at the last staff party, but she knocked him back.
up
on
off
away





7. You have to try _____ a car before buying it.
on
over
out
back





8. You have to try _____ jeans before buying them.
out
in
on
for





9. The burglars first tied the residents _____ and then started robbing the house.
up
out
off
on





10. Time zips _____ so quickly. I can't believe it's Christmas already.
by
back
over
off