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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 72

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. Demand for our main product has certainly dropped _____ this month.
out
off
from
down





2. Could we just run _____ clause 4 again before we finish for the day as there are a couple of things I still don't quite understand?
under
off
out
through





3. I think she's planning to run _____ office. She'd certainly do a better job than the current mayor.
over
to
for
out





4. All I can say is roll _____ the holidays. They can't come soon enough for me.
over
out
on
up





5. The government is doing everything it can to rein _____ public spending. It makes economic sense, but won't be good news for health and education.
in
on
under
over





6. It's no use reeling _____ a lot of statistics. They can always be interpreted to suit the facts. What we need is action.
up
off
over
away





7. I think you'll have to read _____ the subject a bit more before starting a blog.
through on
over about
up on
out on





8. Could you please sweep _____ these leaves? The drive is covered in them.
out
forward
up
about





9. That company has been raking it _____ since they launched their new range. It's basically a licence to print money.
up
down
off
in





10. Here's some money to put _____ the appeal. It's not much, but every little helps.
towards
for
at
on