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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 65

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. We were planning to buy their company, but we have decided to pull _____ the deal as it is just getting too complicated.
out from
off of
by from
out of





2. He's certainly sustained some serious injuries, but the good news is that the doctors are expecting him to pull _____ .
over
down
through
up





3. Rumour has it that John tried it on with Jane at the last staff party, but she knocked him _____. She just wasn't interested.
up
down
back
out





4. The traffic on the highway was terrible. It must have tailed _____ for at least a mile.
over
out
back
up





5. He's promised to stand _____ me at the strategy meeting as I have a doctor's appointment.
in for
up for
under for
over for





6. Management is refusing to budge _____ their original offer of 5%.
down
from
off
away





7. Management is refusing to yield _____ pressure. They are sticking to their original offer of 5%.
through
over
to
back





8. You're going to have to type this _____ as I can't read your handwriting.
off
forward
out
about





9. Martin has written off his new car. He crashed it _____ a wall at 70 miles per hour. He was unhurt, but the car's beyond repair.
to
in
off
into





10. Apparently, Mark was taken _____ by the boss, and told that he would have to improve his performance or they might have to let him go.
under
back
aside
over