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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 74

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. Dave's children have shot _____ since I last saw them. They grow so fast at that age.
off
out
up
on





2. You do realise that your underwear shows _____ those trousers. They're almost transparent.
over
down
out
through





3. Pete's been buying up old houses, doing them _____, and selling them on at a profit.
off
down
up
out





4. My daughter has shacked _____ with her boyfriend. I don't mind the fact that they're living together, but I can't say that I like him very much.
over
out
down
up





5. We can settle _____ later. There's no need to pay me now.
up
away
out
over





6. Mark says he'll never settle _____ and start a family.
under
away
off
down





7. We're still settling _____ to our new home, but you're welcome to drop in on us at any time.
on
over
in
back





8. Winter has set _____ and no mistake. The days have been getting colder and darker for the last couple of weeks.
out
down
in
about





9. This looks as if it's going to set us _____ a small fortune. I had no idea it would be so expensive.
off
down
back
on





10. The court has set _____ the original verdict as new evidence has come to light.
aside
back
over
under