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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 63

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. The police don't know how the robber got _____ the bank without being seen leaving.
out from
out of
by from
down of





2. If the dress is a bit tight, we can always let it _____ a bit.
under
down
out
up





3. If the dress is a bit short, we can always take it _____ a bit.
off
down
up
out





4. If the dress is a bit long, we can always let it _____ a bit.
over
out
down
up





5. He drank so much that he passed _____ and we had to carry him to bed. He'll have a terrible hangover tomorrow.
out
away
under
over





6. I was completely taken _____ by his disguise. I didn't recognise him at all.
up
in
off
away





7. We're all getting _____ next week for a few beers and something to eat.
together
over
by
back





8. When we checked _____ we discovered that the hotel had put us in two singles and not a double as we had asked for.
out
forward
in
about





9. At the last meeting I just couldn't understand what he was _____ . He was making no sense at all as far as I was concerned.
out about
down about
off about
on about





10. I'm afraid he's _____ on business at the moment. Shall I get him to call you back when he returns?
under
back
over
away