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Phrasal and Prepositional verbs present a real problem for the English learner as they are very rarely literal. In other words, it's usually impossible to guess their meaning from their constituent parts. There is no obvious reason why the phrasal verb 'to take on' means to hire, but it does. Try the exercises and see how you do. Reading is one of the best ways to learn some of these verbs as they make a lot more sense in some sort of context.

Phrasal Verbs Multiple Choice 73

Instructions: Click on the answer you think is correct..

1. Shall we eat _____ tonight as I don't feel like cooking and there's a new place that's just opened on the corner.
off
out
away
from





2. Pete's been buying up old houses, doing them up, and selling them _____ at a profit.
under
over
out
on





3. You can leave it with me. I'll deal _____ it.
off
with
down
over





4. You can leave it with me. I'll look _____ it.
over to
into
out to
up to





5. There are still a few things to iron _____ , but we've almost come up with a plan that'll work.
out
away
under
over





6. Could you show Mr. Jones _____ the factory? I think he'd be interested in seeing our production process first hand.
by
around
under
up





7. Could you show Mr. Jones _____ David's office? David's not back yet, but he can wait for him in there.
through
up
into
by





8. How did you manage to mess that _____ ? It's not a difficult thing to do.
over
off
up
out





9. We've just about managed to scrape _____ enough cash for the deposit on a flat. We had to save every penny we could.
over
down
together
out





10. We need something to scare the birds _____ with, or they'll eat all the vegetables.
over
from
away
under